top welcome

welcome

The Disruptive Media Learning Lab (DMLL), is a cross-university experimental unit comprising of academics, learning technologists, subject librarians, educational developers and researchers. The Lab is based in the heart of Coventry University’s campus in a newly refurbished space on the top floor of the Frederick Lanchester Library, uniquely designed to promote open dialogues, collaborative work and exploratory play for all interested in defining the 21st century university.

 

top blog

blog

Coriolanus Online wins the Reimagine Education Arts & Humanities gold award
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18th December 2016

Coriolanus Online, the first stage of the DMLL-supported Telepresence in Theatre Project, has received the gold award in the Arts…

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Yes we can Inchallah: Morocco OER Strategy Forum
openmedcompendium
12th December 2016

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Reposted from the blog of Open Knowledge International‘s Open Education Working Group By Daniel Villar-Onrubia & Javiera Atenas This week…

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DoOO-ing my first DMLL project
6th December 2016

I have been working on a pilot scheme with the DMLL (Disruptive Media Learning Lab) at Coventry University for…

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Drama activities for Health and Wellbeing: Looking back and looking forward / Part 3
5th December 2016

The Arts Gymnasium is an innovative research project which uses theatre and drama activities to contribute to the quality…

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Drama activities for Health and Wellbeing: Looking back and looking forward / Part 2
27th November 2016

The Arts Gymnasium is an innovative research project which uses theatre and drama activities to contribute to the quality…

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Drama activities for Health and Wellbeing: Looking back and looking forward / Part 1
20th November 2016

  The Arts Gymnasium is an innovative research project which uses theatre and drama activities to contribute to the…

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bewilderED: An Experiment in Using Non-Digital, Transmedia Story Telling & Mystery for Exercise Science Education.
bilwidered-logo
18th November 2016

For a long time I have been obsessed with ‘The Mysterious Package Company’ which can be found here: Mysterious Package…

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Developing Interactive Fiction with Learning Objectives for Fostering Player Choice & Ownership in Education.
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18th November 2016

Most people are familiar with the paradigm of ‘Choose Your Own Adventure’ books, but for those who are not…

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top collaborate

collaborate

We are always on the look out for new collaborations or partnerships to work with in realising our visions for disruptive media learning. Please drop us a line. If you work at Coventry University we’ve a short proposal form to focus your ideas. We look forward to hearing from you and will get back to you ASAP.

 

PDF DocumentDMLL Project Proposal Form
Format: Microsoft Word (.docx)

Download Form

top collections

collections

Banned Books:
Lord of the Flies

Banned Books:
Lord of the Flies

William Golding – (1954) Banned for violence, language, sexuality and racism  

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Banned Books:
The Devil Rides Out

Banned Books:
The Devil Rides Out

Dennis Wheatley – (1934) Challenged at the time due to it’s content of satanic rituals and black magic  

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Banned Books:
History of the World

Banned Books:
History of the World

Walter Raleigh – (1614) Banned as considered a political attack on Kings and royalty  

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Banned Books:
Fanny Hill

Banned Books:
Fanny Hill

John Cleland – (1749) Frequently banned and prosecuted for obscene content  

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Banned Books:
Candy

Banned Books:
Candy

Maxwell Kenton – (pseudonym of Terry Southern) –  (1958) Banned for scandalous sexual content  

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Banned Books:
Heather Has Two Mommies

Banned Books:
Heather Has Two Mommies

Leslea Newman – (1989) Challenged under religious issues, claiming the lesbian relationship to be against Biblical teachings & also the discussion of artificial insemination, which was felt inappropriate in a book for young children.

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Banned Books:
Grapes of Wrath

Banned Books:
Grapes of Wrath

 John Steinbeck – (1939) Attacked for social and political views, stemming from its passionate depiction of the plight of the poor and the working class.  

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